Bordeaux vintages-Bordeaux – red | cherokeerally.com

You can read about the growing season in the Medoc , as well as in the Right Bank! Estephe , Pauillac , St. Emilion and Sauternes. We also cover all the important, small appellations and satellite regions as well. Of course there are always some good and even great wines produced in moderate years.

Bordeaux vintages

Bordeaux vintages

Bordeaux vintages resulting wines had both vintayes and elegance, and crucially an ability to age well. Avoid 70 Pts. Drink Bordraux Pts. The season was by no means trouble-free in Sauternes. Late summer was hot and dry. Some leading estates e. After a wet winter, St Emilion and Pomerol endured copious rain during spring and early summer leading to intense fungal-disease pressure. Hold 97 Bordeaux vintages. They will age well. But if it did so, Bordeaux could be saved.

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The red wines have had a good though not quite great year, the Bordeaux vintages factors being the drought viintages high summer and the intermittent rains of the harvest period. Description Harmonious, rich and structured; long-lived. Late August and September were warm but very humid, causing further severe disease pressure. Some properties picked before full maturity; sorting essential to remove unripe berries. Bordeaux vintages Ripe and powerful, with racy tannins and acidity for Bordeaux vintages. Drink or hold 90 Pts. A similar problem comes up with Fine, warm weather ensued, though the cycle was so late that all the fruit was still on the vines when new storms came at the end of September. Drink 84 Bordeaus. Best kept for many a year. Sauternes produced wines of quality as well. It was an excellent harvest for dry whites, which are pure, concentrated and fresh. If Bordeaux vintages stored, many of these wines are still Hot ass asian bitches great pleasure today.

No one could have predicted the impact the Senkalu Island crisis of March , ten years ago, would have on the wine world.

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  • You can read about the growing season in the Medoc , as well as in the Right Bank!

Frost is the major headline for Bordeaux in , resulting in the lowest yield in over 25 years across the region. What was left of the crop had very mixed fortunes. The quality of red Bordeaux in was universally lauded — although the response to the en primeur campaign was muted.

Quantity was high too, with the equivalent of million bottles of wine produced. An exceptionally dry summer with cool nights eventually, thanks to mid September rain, resulted in small, thick-skinned, ripe grapes, and the wines are marked by high tannin and acidity, with superb aromatic fragrance.

It seems so, with particularly healthy, uniform fruit at harvest. A generous flowering and hot, dry early summer was followed by a slighty cooler, damper August.

Harvest was generally earlier than in Reds have fragrance, medium body and supple tannins but are not for long term cellaring. Rot forced relatively early picking. Generally speaking, it was a wet, late year with a hot mid-summer. Bad weather in October compromised quality at the crucial moment, meaning that the earlier-ripening Merlot-based reds were less adversely affected.

Making good Cabernet-based wine was achievable, but only by those who had the resources for micro-management in the vineyard. Generalisations are difficult in this variable year, but there is agreement that quality is back down to earth after the excitement of and , with lower alcohol and generally higher tannins too. A forgettable year. This growing season seemed to have it all. A long, fine, warm summer but, crucially, with refreshing nights to help retain acidity.

Dramatically ripe, voluptuous wines, especially on the left bank. Another ungenerous summer saved by some better weather at the end of the season. Yet again, those properties at the top of the tree managed to field enough good fruit to salvage some pretty impressive grand vin but life was increasingly tough lower down the food chain. An extremely difficult year for growers, with rampant mildew, not enough sun, too much rain until September. Thanks to an arsenal of modern techniques, not least rigorous selection, those who could afford it managed to make attractive wines for relatively early drinking but high prices left the primeur market as flat as a pancake.

Drought and high temperatures were the dominant characteristics until the end of July but August was unusually cool and wet and harvest was interrupted by rain.

Pauillac and Pomerol seemed to perform best in a year that can taste pretty crisp. Textbook perfection during the growing season in all respects other than price.

Best kept for many a year. Large, late crop needed meticulous summer supervision. Grapes were often picked in the rain but healthy at the top end. Not massive but the best really are that rare breed, classic claret.

Best on the left bank where sappy tannins suggest they might be ready to enjoy from Exceptional heatwave resulted in many raisined grapes and uncomfortably dry tannins. Smallish crop dogged by an uneven flowering and a grey, humid summer which meant uneven ripeness in far-from-uniformly healthy grapes. Growers concentrated on the rescue effect of pretty fine weather from 9 September.

The wines are correct and, in a 21st-century context, are not expensive, but they may not last all that long. Extremely varied, large crop which depended on crop-thinning and extremely careful selection to produce exceptional wines. Hot August was followed by dangerously wet September, which sometimes resulted in dilute Merlots and tart Cabernets.

Some good value to be found here, and with time the s showed better and better — especially on the right bank where it can be superior to Great consistency and balance. The best wines should last well into their second or even third decades.

A cool, humid start to the growing season led to excessive vegetation initially. Fairly early maturing wines with better potential on the left bank. Far from dramatic and early developers, these wines were ludicrously overpriced initially but provided some easy drinking in the early years of this century. Few show any possibility of improvement. Hot, dry summer resulted in early harvest of healthy Merlot grapes. Relatively tannic Cabernet Sauvignon was picked after a week of mid-September rain.

Generous crop levels, best in Pomerol and Pauillac. The best year since which is not saying that much. Nicely ripe but September rains were a problem again for less conscientious producers.

The start of Bordeaux's run of bad luck. Second scorching year in a row. Very ripe, alluring wines at all levels, many outstanding. Seemed an unusually hot summer at the time, producing a huge crop of rich, opulent, expensive wines, drinking astonishingly well young.

Some very good right bank wines indeed. And an exceptional year for Haut-Brion. Overshadowed by and Chunky and chewy. Dense, brooding and viciously tannic at first. Some may impress in the end but have required enormous patience. Uniformly lovely, fragrant wines especially but not exclusively from the right bank. Good but less concentrated and opulent than Legendary year, the first of the modern era. The best are still going very strong. Graceful, suave and well-balanced for a time but they should have been drunk in the 20th century.

These firm, sturdy wines, very much of their era, have lasted well but are generally pretty short on flesh. Skip to main navigation.

Close Email or username. Resize Bordeaux — red Frost is the major headline for Bordeaux in , resulting in the lowest yield in over 25 years across the region. Picked earlier, the right bank a better bet than the left. Early maturing. The big left bank names are strongest. A few Pomerols and Pauillacs are huge and magnificent.

The big left bank names are strongest. The mixed but generally warm, dry summer was ideal for white grapes maturation, and the rain which came at the end of August perfect for unleashing botrytis though it also provoked some grey rot. Rain-free harvest. Concentrated, fresh and lower in alcohol than other recent top years like and , they will age and develop well. Drink — 80 Pts.

Bordeaux vintages

Bordeaux vintages

Bordeaux vintages

Bordeaux vintages

Bordeaux vintages. Wine Spectator

Lower yields. Colder September produces classic, firm reds with some variability in maturity of Cabernet Sauvignon. After a wet winter, St Emilion and Pomerol endured copious rain during spring and early summer leading to intense fungal-disease pressure.

Flowering passed off well, though the depradations of downy mildew subsequently reduced the crop in some cases. The three summer months, by contrast, were hot and sunny; indeed Pomerol experienced its sunniest September on record while temperatures in St Emilion were a full 1. Harvesting unfolded at a leisurely pace, and the result is in general a magnficent crop of amply dimensioned yet highly focussed wines.

The wines will in general age very well. As throughout the region, treacherously mild February, March and early April temperatures preceded savage frosts in late April. The resulted in average yields in St Emilion of After a very warm May and June, and a very wet period over the last five days of June, July was dry and mild, and August variable, with the first half of the month cool and the end of the month very warm and wet.

The Merlot crop was picked in generally good weather in mid-September, though with rot threatening some of the bunches. The wines are soft and attractive, fresh without greenness, and will make attractive short to mid-term drinking. After considerable anxiety about disease pressure during the long and colossally wet spring, spirits lifted on the Right Bank during June as summer warmth arrived and the rain clouds cleared. The very dry weather and tempered heat of summer suited Merlot, with July in particular leading to the formation of propitiously thick yet supple skins on the grapes.

Following the mid-September rains, the Merlot berries increased in weight but without any skin-splitting, and the fine weather of the latter half of September was perfect for final ripening. Quality in general is outstanding, with dark, sumptuously rich yet freshly balanced wines; Merlot looks even better than Cabernet Franc. The only exception are those wines grown on sandy soils in St Emilion which sometimes suffered during the long dry months of July and August.

The early growing cycle of Merlot combined with the very warm weather in March and early April put the right bank at considerable frost risk, but this danger was averted. Early June heat caused some Merlot coulure shatter on the right bank, but the overall size of the fruit set mitigated losses. Hot weather in June and July meant that some Pomerol and Merlot producers did less mid-season leaf-plucking than normal.

The right bank received the best of the August rains 5. Both winter and spring were mild, with ample rainfall until March and a dry April. May, by contrast, was cool and damp up to and including the flowering period. This poor weather negatively influenced the early Merlots. July was a little cooler than usual, and August decidedly so.

Harvest, however, came much later, well into October, for wines from the cooler soils and higher altitudes of St Emilion. The conditions suited Cabernet Franc. A cold, late spring, with troublesome, extended, late flowering with comprehensive coulure shatter and millerandage shot berries affecting the Merlot. St Emilion was particularly badly hit by hail in early August. Late August and September were warm but very humid, causing further severe disease pressure.

Harvest took place at the end of September and early October, and required extensive sorting. St Emilion is extremely heterogenous. Challenging season: A wet April disrupted flowering; coulure and mildew reduced the Merlot crop. Late summer was hot and dry. Cabernets and high-sited vineyards struggled to reach maturity. Clay-rich soils fared better, sandy soils worse, due to water stress. Ideal, very dry season without heat extremes. Concentrated, structured wines for long cellaring.

Hot, sunny, dry year. Rich, velvety, powerful wines, high alcohol in some cases. Merlot achieved maturity in general. Supple wines, some highly extracted. Pomerol stands out. Merlot struggled to ripen, some harvested too early. Clay soils performed best. Aromatic, tannic wines for long cellaring. Very dry from winter to harvest.

Right Bank as successful as Left. Concentrated, generous, fleshy wines with ripe tannins. Some reveal lack of maturity, over-extraction. Some sites suffered water stress. Irregular flowering affected Merlot which struggled in late season. Triage was needed to remove undesirable fruit. Very low yields. Diluted wines. Gravel soils dealt best with higher rainfall. Good October weather insures ripening. At its best, concentrated, structured wines which have aged well, though initially in shadow of Vibrating sorting tables make appearance at top estates.

After the very wet spring and late-spring weather which typified Bordeaux in , July brought some localised hail problems with, for example, Ch Guiraud losing 95 per cent of its crop on July 15th; other properties lost crop to mildew depradations.

The long, warm, dry summer which followed improved matters Around 30 mm of rain finally fell at the end of the month, provoking botrytis spores into action, with full botrytisation under way by mid-October. Acidities are sometimes low but the wines are lush, fruity and sensual, and should make an attractive mid-term ageing prospect. Sauternes, and especially the sub-region of Barsac, was as badly hit as other regions of Bordeaux by the April frosts, and some properties like Ch Climens have made no wine at all this year.

The mixed but generally warm, dry summer was ideal for white grapes maturation, and the rain which came at the end of August perfect for unleashing botrytis though it also provoked some grey rot. There were three main harvest sweeps, one in September perfumed and fresh , and two in October much richer. Quantities were very small, but quality is outstanding: concentrated and dense, but lively and racy, too. The long, dry, warm summer meant ample ripeness but no botrytis by the beginning of September.

Flowering went well, though the fruit set was modest rather than generous; the vines withstood the midsummer heat well. The four episodes of autumn rain proved particularly beneficial for Sauternes as this initiated the development of botrytis much earlier than usual. From that point onwards, storms followed by sunny weather provided ideal conditions for slow, regular harvesting between early September and late October.

They will age well. The season was by no means trouble-free in Sauternes. Dry weather throughout the rest of the month held noble rot in check. Rain on October 9 th , though, finally unleashed botrytis, and the Indian summer meant a leisurely harvest of berries in perfect condition via an extensive series of tries.

Sauternes suffered the same problems as the rest of Bordeaux through the first half of the growing season: unseasonably wet and cold weather with difficult flowering.

The hot, dry weather in July turned the tide, and the warm, humid conditions in August and September benefitted sweet wines, with extensive noble rot developing and spreading swiftly in the latter month. It was an early and generous harvest for Sauternes, beginning at the same time as the red harvest at the end of September and continuing throughout October, with several breaks for storms.

Rain ended harvest 1st week of November. Some leading estates e. Varying degrees of noble rot. Multidimensional, complex wines with pronounced noble rot; enormous richness matched by harmonious structure. Of course there are always some good and even great wines produced in moderate years. For example, has a few great wines, but numerous properties did not excel. A similar problem comes up with Some wines are off the charts, they are so good. But there are numerous failures as well.

Still, the best of those wines are for me absolutely compelling. Although today, due to age, storage, provenance and counterfeits, buyers of these wines should exercise extreme caution and purchase them from only known and trusted sources, or major auction houses that thoroughly vet the wines.

Emilion from those years. The problem is exacerbated with large formats. The majority of large format famous wines for sale are fake! This needs to be taken into consideration before you even think about storage and provenance. Potential buyers of these exceedingly rare wines should exercise extreme caution and purchase them from only known and trusted sources, or major auction houses that thoroughly vet the wines.

That means the wines at the top are of extreme quality as are value wines. The wines should offer a unique character and have the ability to age and evolve. The wines are dark in color, with concentration, opulent textures, silky tannins and purity. High in alcohol, and equally high in acidity, there are many wines from that are the best ever from several chateau. Hold 97 Pts. The wines are best in the northern Medoc, becoming less consistent the further south you go.

The wines have early drinking potential. Hold 92 Pts. Estephe and St. Good but mixed in other appellations. However, interestingly, some vineyards in Pomerol and St.

Emilion made the best wines in their history! The wines are inky in color, aromatic and offer luscious textures and silky tannins. Concentrated, fresh and lower in alcohol than other recent top years like and , they will age and develop well.

Strong from top to bottom. Dry white Bordeaux and sweet Bordeaux are mixed, as some wines are low in acidity. Hold 98 Pts. Perhaps, not quite at the level of , bit close. Pomerol and Saint Emilion are just stunning! Rich, ripe, fleshy, opulent and even decadent, the wines taste and feel great! Margaux is a revelation. In the Medoc, St. Estephe can be weak, but good wines were produced in Pauillac and Saint Julien. The sweet white wines from Sauternes are delicious! Drink or hold.

The wines are especially strong the further north you go, with Pauillac and St. Estephe producing really good wine, followed by St. Julien and Margaux. The wines are soft, ripe and display silky tannins with good concentration. Due to their forward style, while age worthy, many of the wines will be fun to drink early. Emilion and moderate in Pomerol, with many wines possessing a slightly dilute character.

Sauternes and Barsac was also successful. Julien and Pomerol are the top two appellations. Dry white Bordeaux wine on the other hand was extremely successful.

Enjoy the red wines on the young side. Drink 83 Pts. The best wines come from Pomerol and St. While the dry white wines are of high quality, Sauternes was a disaster.

Drink 89 Pts. Emilion that could be described as classic. Drink 85 Pts. Margaux, Pauillac, Pessac Leognan and St. Emilion are the best regions. Sauternes was also successful. The wines are ripe, sexy and lush. Pomerol, Pauillac, Pessac Leognan and St. Estephe produced the best Bordeaux wines.

Bordeaux Chart to Today, Rankings Characteristics

You can read about the growing season in the Medoc , as well as in the Right Bank! Estephe , Pauillac , St. Emilion and Sauternes. We also cover all the important, small appellations and satellite regions as well. Of course there are always some good and even great wines produced in moderate years. For example, has a few great wines, but numerous properties did not excel. A similar problem comes up with Some wines are off the charts, they are so good.

But there are numerous failures as well. Still, the best of those wines are for me absolutely compelling. Although today, due to age, storage, provenance and counterfeits, buyers of these wines should exercise extreme caution and purchase them from only known and trusted sources, or major auction houses that thoroughly vet the wines.

Emilion from those years. The problem is exacerbated with large formats. The majority of large format famous wines for sale are fake! This needs to be taken into consideration before you even think about storage and provenance.

Potential buyers of these exceedingly rare wines should exercise extreme caution and purchase them from only known and trusted sources, or major auction houses that thoroughly vet the wines. That means the wines at the top are of extreme quality as are value wines. The wines should offer a unique character and have the ability to age and evolve.

The wines are dark in color, with concentration, opulent textures, silky tannins and purity. High in alcohol, and equally high in acidity, there are many wines from that are the best ever from several chateau. Hold 97 Pts.

The wines are best in the northern Medoc, becoming less consistent the further south you go. The wines have early drinking potential. Hold 92 Pts. Estephe and St. Good but mixed in other appellations. However, interestingly, some vineyards in Pomerol and St. Emilion made the best wines in their history! The wines are inky in color, aromatic and offer luscious textures and silky tannins.

Concentrated, fresh and lower in alcohol than other recent top years like and , they will age and develop well. Strong from top to bottom. Dry white Bordeaux and sweet Bordeaux are mixed, as some wines are low in acidity. Hold 98 Pts. Perhaps, not quite at the level of , bit close. Pomerol and Saint Emilion are just stunning! Rich, ripe, fleshy, opulent and even decadent, the wines taste and feel great!

Margaux is a revelation. In the Medoc, St. Estephe can be weak, but good wines were produced in Pauillac and Saint Julien. The sweet white wines from Sauternes are delicious! Drink or hold. The wines are especially strong the further north you go, with Pauillac and St. Estephe producing really good wine, followed by St. Julien and Margaux. The wines are soft, ripe and display silky tannins with good concentration. Due to their forward style, while age worthy, many of the wines will be fun to drink early.

Emilion and moderate in Pomerol, with many wines possessing a slightly dilute character. Sauternes and Barsac was also successful. Julien and Pomerol are the top two appellations. Dry white Bordeaux wine on the other hand was extremely successful.

Enjoy the red wines on the young side. Drink 83 Pts. The best wines come from Pomerol and St. While the dry white wines are of high quality, Sauternes was a disaster. Drink 89 Pts. Emilion that could be described as classic. Drink 85 Pts. Margaux, Pauillac, Pessac Leognan and St. Emilion are the best regions. Sauternes was also successful. The wines are ripe, sexy and lush. Pomerol, Pauillac, Pessac Leognan and St. Estephe produced the best Bordeaux wines.

Prices remain fair for the quality. Hold 91 Pts. Drink 87 Pts. Hold Pts. Some strong wines were produced in St. Emilion from heavy limestone soils. Avoid Pomerol wines. But at the top end, Bordeaux wines are stunning. The best wines came from Pomerol and St.

Emilion as well as Sauternes. Many of the wines are ready to drink. It might look expensive today, but when these wines mature, prices will be much higher.

Drink or hold Pts. The Medoc was mixed. Pessac Leognan offers good wines. Strong wines are harder to find in the Left Bank. The best Right Bank wines are not quite at the level of , but they sell for much less money and they are delicious. Sauternes produced wines of quality as well. The wines are much better in the Left Bank, where the Cabernet Sauvignon excelled. Avoid Pomerol and St. The wines from the Right Bank, Pomerol and St. Drink or hold 90 Pts. Merlot based wines were better in this year.

The petit chateaux should have been drunk up a few years ago. The wines have a richness and roasted character, with round textures and a beautiful, ripe, purity of fruit. With the exception of the perfect, legendary Haut Brion , the First Growths were not the top wines. Many of the wines are ripe, rich and silky. The wines are not developing as well as people had hoped. Some have developed a green, herbal or olive sensation. Drink 82 Pts. Drink 80 Pts. Margaux and Sauternes were the best appellations.

The wines were great from both banks in every appellation. If well stored, the better wines will improve with additional cellaring. Drink 84 Pts. Today, with the exception of Chateau Lafleur , they are all in decline.

Bordeaux vintages

Bordeaux vintages